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1990s Debut Albums September 18, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Jazz, Music, New Age.
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The last episode (for now?) of Mike Chimeri’s Music Collection is devoted to 1990s jazz and new age debut albums.

Note and links from the video description:
This episode was recorded in mid-July, a few weeks before guitarist Chuck Loeb passed away.

Chuck Loeb, “Life Colors” (1990): https://www.amazon.com/Life-Colors-Chuck-Loeb/dp/B000003DDE/

Dave Koz, “Dave Koz” (1990): https://www.amazon.com/Dave-Koz/dp/B000002UUL/
Dave’s website: http://davekoz.com/

Ken Navarro, “The River Flows” (1990): https://www.amazon.com/River-Flows-Ken-Navarro/dp/B000000JYI/
Ken’s website: http://www.kennavarro.com/

Fourplay, “Fourplay” (1991): https://www.amazon.com/Fourplay-FOURPLAY/dp/B000002LQ5/
Fourplay’s website: http://fourplayjazz.com/

Norman Brown, “Just Between Us” (1992): https://www.amazon.com/Just-Between-Us-Norman-Brown/dp/B000001AL7/
Norman’s website: http://normanbrown.com/

Craig Chaquico, “Acoustic Highway” (1993): https://www.amazon.com/Acoustic-Highway-Craig-Chaquico/dp/B00001NFR2/
Craig’s website: http://craigchaquico.com/

Down to the Bone, “From Manhattan to Staten” (1997): https://www.amazon.com/Manhattan-Staten-Down-Bone/dp/B000001YJZ/
DTTB website: http://www.downtothebone.com/

Steve Cole, “Stay Awhile” (1998): https://www.amazon.com/Stay-Awhile-Steve-Cole/dp/B0000062SV/
Steve’s website: http://stevecole.net/

Title music: “Wishing for Something” by Jay Dobbins, from “Anything for You” (2013): https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/jaydobbins

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1980s Debut Albums September 12, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Internet, Jazz, Music, Radio.
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The next-to-last episode (for now?) of Mike Chimeri’s Music Collection focuses on 1980s jazz debut albums. It’s the first of two episodes where I worked off a script. I didn’t quote it verbatim, though.

At one point, I share a funny story about talking up one of the Rippingtons songs one week on The Mike Chimeri Show.

Links from the video description:
Dan Siegel, “Nite Ride” (1980): https://www.ebay.com/sch/Music/11233/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=dan+siegel+nite+ride
“Nite Ride/The Hot Shot/Oasis” (without “Valdez in the Country”): https://www.amazon.com/Nite-Ride-Hot-Shot-Oasis/dp/B01FWBZ09M/
Dan’s website: http://www.dansiegelmusic.com/

Kenny G, “Kenny G” (1982): https://www.amazon.com/Kenny-G/dp/B000002VC4/
Kenny’s website: https://kennyg.com/

Special EFX, “Special EFX” (1984): https://www.amazon.com/Special-Efx/dp/B000008CAX/
Chieli Minucci’s website: http://chielimusic.com/

Richard Elliot, “Initial Approach” (1984):
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Initial-Approach-Richard-Elliot/dp/B000005HH8/
eBay: https://www.ebay.com/sch/Music/11233/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=richard+elliot+initial+approach
Richard’s website: http://richardelliot.com/

Najee, “Najee’s Theme” (1986): https://www.amazon.com/Najees-Theme-Najee/dp/B00000DQTI/
Najee’s website: http://www.najeeofficial.com/

The Rippingtons, “Moonlighting” (1986): https://www.amazon.com/Moonlighting-Rippingtons/dp/B0000001QV/
The Rippingtons’ website: http://rippingtons.com/

Gregg Karukas, “The Nightowl” (1987): https://www.amazon.com/Nightowl-Gregg-Karukas/dp/B00005U5CD/
Gregg’s website: http://www.karukas.com/

Gerald Albright, “Just Between Us” (1987): https://www.amazon.com/Just-Between-Us-Gerald-Albright/dp/B000002IM3/
Gerald’s website: http://geraldalbright.com/

Acoustic Alchemy, “Red Dust & Spanish Lace” (1987): https://www.amazon.com/Dust-Spanish-Lace-Acoustic-Alchemy/dp/B0000001VE/
Acoustic Alchemy’s website: http://www.acoustic-alchemy.net/

Nelson Rangell, “To Begin Again” (1988):
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Begin-Again-Nelson-Rangell/dp/B0002AAOG8/
eBay: https://www.ebay.com/sch/Music/11233/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=nelson+rangell+to+begin+again
Nelson’s website: http://nelsonrangell.com/

Eric Marienthal, “Voices of the Heart” (1988): https://www.amazon.com/Voices-Heart-Eric-Marienthal/dp/B000008BOC/
Eric’s website: http://ericmarienthal.com/

Kim Pensyl, “Pensyl Sketches #1” (1988): https://www.amazon.com/Pensyl-Sketches-Vol-1-Kim/dp/B000008BZ2/
Kim P.’s website: https://www.kimpensyl.com/

Kim Waters, “Sweet and Saxy” (1989): https://www.amazon.com/Sweet-Saxy-Kim-Waters/dp/B0000010HV/
Kim W.’s website: http://kimwaters.net/

Title music: “Wishing for Something” by Jay Dobbins, from “Anything for You” (2013): https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/jaydobbins

Albums by Sidemen September 4, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Interviews, Jazz, Music, Radio.
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The latest episode of Mike Chimeri’s Music Collection is dedicated to 11 sidemen, some of whom I’ve gotten to know over the years.

I interviewed three of the sidemen – Tom Schuman, Bill Heller, and Jay Rowe – on The Mike Chimeri Show in 2005 and 2006. Those interviews can be found here.

The late Chuck Loeb had a hand in three of the albums. I recorded this episode before he passed away.

Links from the video description:
Al Turner, “Movin'” (2008): https://www.amazon.com/Movin-Al-Turner/dp/B0015U0OLE/
Original version: “It’s Good to Have Friends” (2005): https://www.amazon.com/Its-Good-Have-Friends-Turner/dp/B0009XEU5E/
Al’s website: http://www.alturner.com/

Ron Otis, “Upfront” (2009): https://www.amazon.com/Upfront-Ron-Otis/dp/B005W4S9JI/
Ron’s website: http://ronotis.net/

Nathan East, “Reverence” (2017): https://www.amazon.com/Upfront-Ron-Otis/dp/B005W4S9JI/
Nate’s website: http://nathaneast.com/

Mike Ricchiuti, “The Way I See It” (2003): https://www.amazon.com/Way-I-See-Mike-Ricchiuti/dp/B000CAGNQS/

Peter Horvath, “Absolute Reality” (2016): https://www.amazon.com/Absolute-Reality-Peter-Horvath/dp/B01AAZ1P3U/
Peter’s website: https://www.peterhorvath.com/

Eric Gunnison, “Trios” (2011): https://www.amazon.com/Trios-Eric-Gunnison/dp/B00532DJUS/
Eric’s website: http://www.ericgunnison.com/
Nelson Rangell, “The Red Pill” (Live): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mjjzrFp1bk

Dan Reynolds, “Never Alone” (1993):
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Never-Alone-Dan-Reynolds/dp/B01G4CFF7K/
eBay: https://www.ebay.com/sch/Music/11233/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=dan+reynolds+never+alone

Jay Rowe, “Red Hot & Smooth” (2006): https://www.amazon.com/Red-Hot-Smooth-Jay-Rowe/dp/B000GBE644/
Jay’s website: http://jayrowemusic.com/

Bill Heller, “Find the Way” (2014): https://www.amazon.com/Find-Way-Bill-Heller/dp/B00LJBTNT8/
Bill’s website: http://www.billunaticmusic.com/

Rico Belled, “The Pursuit of Comfort” (2010): https://www.amazon.com/Pursuit-Comfort-Rico-Belled/dp/B003VW3FV0/
Rico’s website: http://www.ricobelled.com/

Tom Schuman, “Deep Chill” (2006): https://www.amazon.com/Deep-Chill-Tom-Schuman/dp/B000BOW2OC/
Tom’s website: http://www.tomschuman.de/us-start.html

Title music: “Wishing for Something” by Jay Dobbins, from “Anything for You” (2013): https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/jaydobbins

9 Albums from 2000 August 28, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Jazz, Music.
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In this episode of Mike Chimeri’s Music Collection, I go through nine albums from the turn of the millennium.

Links from the video description:
Acoustic Alchemy, “The Beautiful Game”: https://www.amazon.com/Beautiful-Game…
Acoustic Alchemy’s website: http://www.acoustic-alchemy.net/

Jay Beckenstein, “Eye Contact”: https://www.amazon.com/Eye-Contact-Ja…
The late Chuck Loeb played a role in this album. I recorded this episode before he passed away.

Boney James & Rick Braun, “Shake It Up”: https://www.amazon.com/Shake-Up-Boney…
Boney’s website: http://boneyjames.com/
Rick’s website: http://www.rickbraun.com/

Fourplay, “Yes, Please!”: https://www.amazon.com/Yes-Please-Fou…
Fourplay’s website: http://fourplayjazz.com/

The Rippingtons, “Life in the Tropics”: https://www.amazon.com/Life-Tropics-R…
The Rippingtons’ website: http://rippingtons.com/
NOTE: After uploading this video, I learned from a Jeff Kashiwa Facebook video that the “c” is silent in Dave Kochanski’s last name. I’ve been saying it wrong for years. Sorry, Dave.

Nelson Rangell, “Far Away Day”: https://www.amazon.com/Far-Away-Day-N…
Nelson’s website: http://nelsonrangell.com/

Ken Navarro, “Island Life”: https://www.amazon.com/Island-Life-Ke…
Ken’s website: http://www.kennavarro.com/

Gregg Karukas, “Nightshift”: https://www.amazon.com/Nightshift-Gre…
Gregg’s website: http://www.karukas.com/

David Benoit, “Here’s to You, Charlie Brown: 50 Great Years!”: https://www.amazon.com/Heres-You-Char…
David’s website: http://benoit.com/

Title music: “Wishing for Something” by Jay Dobbins, from “Anything for You” (2013): https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/jaydobbins

2000s Debut Albums August 22, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Jazz, Music.
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The fourth episode of Mike Chimeri’s Music Collection focuses on five debut albums from the 2000s, all but one of them by saxophonists.

Links from the video description:
Gordon Goodwin’s Big Phat Band, “Swingin’ for the Fences” (2001):
Original release: https://www.amazon.com/Swingin-Fences…
Reissue: https://www.amazon.com/Swingin-Fences…
Big Phat Band website: http://www.bigphatband.com/

Shilts, “See What Happens” (2001): https://www.amazon.com/See-What-Happe…

Mindi Abair, “It Just Happens That Way” (2003): https://www.amazon.com/Just-Happens-T…
Mindi’s website: http://www.mindiabair.com/

Eric Darius, “Night on the Town” (2004): https://www.amazon.com/Night-Town-Eri…
Eric’s website: http://ericdarius.com/

Jessy J, “Tequila Moon” (2008): https://www.amazon.com/Tequila-Moon-J…
Jessy’s website: http://jessyj.com/

Title music: “Wishing for Something” (a tribute to Jessy J) by Jay Dobbins, from “Anything for You” (2013): https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/jaydobbins

Long Island Retro Gaming Expo, Day 2 August 14, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Art, Football, Internet, Music, Personal, Photography, Sports, Technology, Travel, Video, Video Games.
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I’ve been to jazz performances, comedy acts, and New York Comic Con. But yesterday marked my first time at a retro gaming convention. I made my way to the Cradle of Aviation Museum in East Garden City for the second day of this year’s Long Island Retro Gaming Expo.

Within the last year, I’ve become a regular YouTube viewer, gravitating toward channels about computers, music keyboards, video games, video game and console collecting, and what equipment to use to get the best picture quality out of video game consoles on an HDTV. These videos inspired me to start the Mike Chimeri’s Music Collection YouTube series. Here’s the latest episode:

Two of the YouTube channels I watch are The 8-Bit Guy and 8-Bit Keys, both run by David Murray. (He also has a website.) In a video earlier this year, David announced he would be appearing at the Long Island Retro Gaming Expo. With that in mind, I bought a ticket for the second day.

When I purchased my ticket, I was automatically subscribed to the expo newsletter. With a month to go, the schedule was released. It turned out the first day would be more eventful, with many guest speakers, including David. In fact, my friend Jill and her son Mark went on the first day and saw him speak. But I chose to stick with my decision to only go to the second day, since David was also listed as a vendor.

I left for the Cradle of Aviation Museum, part of Museum Row, at 11:30. 20 minutes later, I was there.

I was directed to a desk, where I exchanged my ticket for a wristband.

I also bought into a raffle at the information desk:

After a few minutes of walking by vendors, I spotted David Murray. I introduced myself and we had a brief conversation. He graciously allowed a picture with him, which his wife took:

It slipped my mind that he should sign something until he brought it up after the picture. I had him sign my program:

It turned out David wasn’t a vendor on the second day because he had sold all his merchandise on the first day. I was disappointed, but still honored to meet him and his wife. Be sure to check out The 8-Bit Guy and 8-Bit Keys. And if you like what you see, consider supporting the channels on Patreon. I do.

After that, I toured the rest of the vendors.

I held off on buying anything until I was ready to leave.

The tournament room:

The second floor had freeplays on various consoles and CRT TVs, as well as arcade cabinets:

I gave Mega Man and Castlevania a try, but struggled and gave up after losing a life:

I played a successful level of Dr. Mario, a favorite of mine:

I’ve always liked how the “Chill” tune briefly pays homage to “St. Thomas” by Sonny Rollins.

I first discovered the arcade version of Tetris at the since-closed Kutsher’s Hotel in 1995. My former dentist also had a Tetris cabinet for many years. Back in 2010, I bought the rare, unlicensed NES port on eBay. The music and gameplay sound just like the arcade. I also have the licensed Nintendo version.

I subscribed to Nintendo Power for several years. Game Genies for many consoles helped me greatly. The NES version allowed me to beat Super Mario Bros. 3 many times.

Here are R.O.B. (Robotic Operating Buddy), the Virtual Boy, and the Power Glove:

One of my cousins had a Virtual Boy, which I tried in 1995, six months after the Kutsher’s weekend, and did not like.

I quickly walked the third floor where there was PC LAN freeplay:

Back on the second floor, AfroDJMac played our favorite retro tunes:

Madden:

A corridor of freeplay:

Back to the first floor:

Board games, or tabletop games:

In just over an hour, I’d seen everything. All that remained was to go back to the Vendor Hall and buy some games I’ve always wanted, but never owned. Consider this the equivalent of a pickups video. The games I bought were:

Nintendo Game Boy:

  • Monopoly
  • Elmo’s ABCs (don’t judge)
  • Mickey’s Speedway USA

Sega Genesis:

  • Tecmo Super Bowl

Nintendo 64:

  • Cruis’n World
  • Top Gear Rally

Nintendo Gamecube:

  • Super Monkey Ball

Nintendo DS:

  • Kirby Mass Attack

I also bought a Nintendo Game Boy Advance SP model AGS-101:

For over a decade, I’ve had the frontlit AGS-001. I was satisfied with the quality until I found out in this My Life in Gaming video…

…and this Metal Jesus Rocks video…

…that there was a second model, the AGS-101, which was not only backlit, but brighter! The difference is amazing. On top of that, as you saw, the GBA SP I bought was a Limited Edition Pikachu version. I’m not into Pokémon, but it’s still special to have.

I was hoping to get a Sega Saturn at a decent price, but did not succeed. I’ll have to settle for eBay sometime in the future.

There was one item I bought that was neither a game nor a console. It was pixel art by Joseph Uzzo who has a blog called Nestalgic Bits. I picked out a standing sprite of Raccoon Mario from Super Mario Bros. 3:

I may have only been at the Long Island Retro Gaming Expo for a couple of hours, but I had a great time. Thanks to the expo staff, the vendors, the Cradle of Aviation Museum, Joseph Uzzo, the Murrays, and my fellow game enthusiasts.

8 Albums from 1992 August 14, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Jazz, Music.
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In the third episode of Mike Chimeri’s Music Collection, I look at eight albums from 25 years ago, and also share my memories and experiences listening to the songs. You’ll be hearing more of that in future episodes.

Links from the video description:
The Rippingtons, “Weekend in Monaco”: https://www.amazon.com/Weekend-Monaco…
The Rippingtons’ website: http://rippingtons.com/

After Five Jazz, “Expressions”: https://www.amazon.com/Expressions-Af…

Bob James & Earl Klugh, “Cool”: https://www.amazon.com/Cool-Bob-James…
Bob’s website: http://bobjames.com/
Earl’s website: http://earlklugh.com/

David Benoit, “Letter to Evan”: https://www.amazon.com/Letter-Evan-Da…
David’s website: http://benoit.com/

Larry Carlton, “Kid Gloves”: https://www.amazon.com/Kid-Gloves-Lar…
Larry’s website: http://larrycarlton.com/

Spyro Gyra, “Three Wishes”: https://www.amazon.com/3-Wishes-Spyro…
Spyro Gyra’s website: http://spyrogyra.com/

GRP All-Star Big Band, “GRP All-Star Big Band”: https://www.amazon.com/All-Star-Big-B…

Ken Navarro, “The Labor of Love”: https://www.amazon.com/Labor-Love-Ken…
Ken’s website: http://www.kennavarro.com/

Title music: “Wishing for Something” by Jay Dobbins, from “Anything for You” (2013): https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/jaydobbins

1970s Debut Albums August 7, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Jazz, Music.
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In the second episode of Mike Chimeri’s Music Collection, I showcase six debut albums in my collection from the 1970s, released in a three-year span.

Links from the video description:
Earl Klugh, “Earl Klugh” (1976): https://www.amazon.com/Earl-Klugh/dp/…
Earl’s website: http://earlklugh.com/

Lee Ritenour, “First Course” (1976): https://www.amazon.com/Lee-Ritenour-F…
Lee’s website: http://leeritenour.com/

David Benoit, “Heavier Than Yesterday” (1977): https://www.amazon.com/Heavier-Than-Y…
David’s website: http://benoit.com/

The Jeff Lorber Fusion, “The Jeff Lorber Fusion” (1977): https://www.amazon.com/Jeff-Lorber-Fu…
Jeff’s website: http://www.lorber.com/

Spyro Gyra, “Spyro Gyra” (1977): https://www.amazon.com/Spyro-Gyra/dp/…
Spyro Gyra’s website: http://spyrogyra.com/

Pat Metheny Group, “Pat Metheny Group” (1978): https://www.amazon.com/Pat-Metheny-Gr…
Pat’s website: http://www.patmetheny.com/

Title music: “Wishing for Something” by Jay Dobbins from “Anything for You” (2013): https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/jaydobbins

6 Albums from 1981 July 31, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Jazz, Music.
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The premiere episode of Mike Chimeri’s Music Collection is now up. For it, I chose six albums from 1981, two with Joe Sample. Enjoy.

Links from the video description:
Dan Siegel, “The Hot Shot”: https://www.ebay.com/sch/Music/11233/…
“Nite Ride/The Hot Shot/Oasis” (without “Valdez in the Country”: https://www.amazon.com/Nite-Ride-Hot-…
Dan’s website: http://www.dansiegelmusic.com/

David Sanborn, “Voyeur”: https://www.amazon.com/Voyeur-David-S…
David’s website: http://davidsanborn.com/

Spyro Gyra, “Freetime”: https://www.amazon.com/Freetime-Spyro…
Spyro Gyra’s website: http://spyrogyra.com/

Joe Sample, “Voices in the Rain”: https://www.amazon.com/Voices-Rain-Jo…

The Crusaders, “Standing Tall”: https://www.amazon.com/Standing-Tall-…

Yellowjackets, “Yellowjackets”: https://www.amazon.com/Yellowjackets-…
Yellowjackets’ website: http://www.yellowjackets.com/

Title music: “Wishing for Something” by Jay Dobbins, from “Anything for You”: https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/jaydobbins

A day at two museums and one park July 21, 2017

Posted by Mike C. in Art, Education, Film, History, Jazz, Music, Personal, Photography, Travel.
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One day last July, my friend Lori Downing and I toured the Fire Island Lighthouse. On Wednesday, our destination was Corona, Queens, to tour a pair of museums. Our first stop was the Louis Armstrong House Museum on 107th Street, followed by the Queens Museum in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. In between, we walked through the park to see two relics from the 1964 New York World’s Fair: the abandoned New York State Pavilion, and the Unisphere. That part of this post includes home movies my grandfather shot at the fair, as well as recollections from my aunt Randy and Hank Neimark.

It took an hour and a half to get to our first stop due to heavy traffic on the Long Island Expressway (I-495) and Grand Central Parkway, and limited parking spots near the house. We parked a block away on 108th Street.

It would be 20 minutes until the next tour, so we walked through the garden…

…and looked at the pre-tour exhibits:

Photography was not allowed during the tour, but was allowed everywhere else.

I’m familiar with “What a Wonderful World,” but not enough to know it was recorded in 1967. That means this year marks its 50th anniversary:

The gift shop at the entrance:

The tour began just after noon. Our guide was Elaine, a museum docent that lives only 12 blocks away. She brought us back to the exhibit room for a short introductory DVD. It was then that I learned his name is pronounced phonetically, as in “Lewis,” not “Louie.” After the DVD, Elaine guided us to the house.

Everything in the house is nearly as it was when Louis’s wife Lucille died in 1983, 12 years after his passing. Even the doorbell, which Elaine rang before we walked in, was original.

After walking in, Elaine guided us to the living room, which included portraits of Louis and Lucille, lavish furnishings, and a Spinet piano (which he didn’t play).

Louis and I have something in common: home speech recordings. His medium was reel-to-reel tape; my media were cassette and microcassette. When I was younger, I would record myself, either talking about what I’d been up to recently, interviewing family members, or co-hosting a “radio show” with my cousin Chris. That last one was also recorded on video. While we were in the den, Elaine played a few examples of Louis’s speech recordings. As we learned later in the tour, he also recorded singing and trumpet improvisation from home.

The next stop was the downstairs bathroom with bathtub. The wall and ceiling were all mirrors. After that, it was on to the dining room, which led into the kitchen. Floral wallpaper adorned the walls and part of the ceiling. The cabinets and dishwasher were blue while the counter, sink, and dual oven (with six gas burners) was white. A can opener was built into the wall along with a compartment with paper towels, foil, and plastic wrap. Adjacent to the kitchen was a smaller dining room, which served as Louis and Lucille’s bedroom while Lucille’s mother lived with them and stayed in their bedroom.

The tour headed upstairs where the aforementioned bedroom and recording room were located. The bedroom had a double-size bed with drawers on either side, paintings of scenery hanging on the walls, Mylar wallpaper, a lamp, and a chandelier. The Mylar wallpaper carried into the spacious bathroom and closet. The recording room had reel-to-reel tape decks, amps, a record player, radio, shelves of records and tapes, a desk, and a portrait of Louis painted by his friend Tony Bennett. Bennett signed it with his real surname: Benedetto. Actually, the tapes and records are housed at Queens College, but will move to the Education Center that is going to be constructed across the street from Louis’s house.

That concluded the tour. I didn’t list everything that Lori and I saw and were told by Elaine, but I feel I’ve shared enough. I highly recommend taking the tour. Plan your visit here.

When we got back outside, Elaine suggested we pose with Louis’s cutout. She said it was necessary to gesture as he did:

Lori suggested taking one with Elaine:

In the gift shop, I bought a sticker, pin, picture postcards, and a DVD of an American Masters documentary from 1989: Satchmo: The Life of Louis Armstrong. Some of the interviews were filmed in the living room.

Before we left, I signed the guest book:

Lori and I walked back to her car and we drove to the Queens Museum at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

As I noted at the top, we walked through the park first. On our way to the Unisphere, I got a great view of the New York State Pavilion:

The Unisphere:

Lori walked toward the fountains, but I stayed behind; I didn’t want to get wet:

A different angle:

A closer look at the New York State Pavilion:

I even caught a quick glimpse inside the pavilion right before the gates were closed:

They were open because New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio toured the interior earlier in the afternoon.

Lori was fortunate enough to attend the 1964 New York World’s Fair, as did my grandparents, parents, and my parents’ siblings. My maternal grandfather, Arthur Rose, brought his movie camera to the fair and captured what he saw. The film, along with all of his home movies, was transferred to VHS 30 years ago. Six years ago, I transferred the VHS tapes to an external hard drive and then to DVDs.

Here is what my grandfather captured:

I also posted the film to Facebook, which garnered nothing but positive feedback and memories. My aunt Randy Stephen (née Rose), who was in the film, had this to say:

That was really wonderful, Mike (although I can just imagine how many times grandma must have yelled at grandpa for his camera work 😝)! I do remember going to the World’s Fair a few times, although I was only 6 or 7 at the time. The kid going crazy in the beginning must have been Bruce Goldberger, since I saw his mom, Ann, in the movie, as well. They were our neighbors in [the] Colony Park [section of Freeport].

Hank Neimark – a fellow alumnus of LIU Post and its radio station, WCWP – was there, too:

Michael Kosmin (Charter WCWP-FM guy) and I, claiming that we were doing radio reports on the ’64 World’s Fair, managed to get rides on the Goodyear Blimp. We contacted Goodyear PR, got permission over the phone, and with Nagra in hand headed out to the now abandoned Flushing airport. Of course we weren’t on the air yet, butcha know…. What a thrill. Over Manhattan, over the bridges, and over the Fair. We hitched on to the blimp twice.

Thank you to Hank and Aunt Randy for your stories.

Before heading into the Queens Museum, I heard a plane flying overhead – likely approaching nearby LaGuardia Airport – and quickly photographed it:

Founded in 1972, the Queens Museum is housed in the New York City Building, a pavilion built for the 1939 New York World’s Fair and used again for the 1964 fair. In between the fairs, it was the home of the United Nations General Assembly for the U.N.’s first few years of existence. (Sources: Building History | Queens Museum, Queens Museum Wikipedia entry)

Lori and I looked at a few exhibits in the museum, starting with another relic of the 1964 World’s Fair: the Panorama of the City of New York:

I had to sharpen the pictures below since they came out blurry.

I didn’t have to sharpen these:

World’s Fair Visible Storage:

This houses memorabilia from the 1939 and 1964 World’s Fairs.

Nine: 2017 Queens Museum Studio Program Exhibition:

Our second museum trip concluded with the Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass:

After I bought a book of World’s Fair postcards in the gift shop, Lori and I returned to the car and she drove me home. There was heavy traffic going back, too, so it took another hour and a half to get home. The traffic gave us plenty of time to talk and listen to the jazz CDs I brought with me.

I had a wonderful time at the museums and in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. Thanks again, Lori. Until next year.